Fashion and Shopping

What will a Marks and Spencer shopping trip look like after lockdown?

You may have been visiting your local Marks and Spencer a lot during lockdown. Like all supermarkets, its near-600 food halls have remained open so that shoppers can pick up essential supplies like milk, bread and toilet paper.

If you had been after a multipack of socks or a pair of children’s shoes though, you’d have been out of luck, as all other departments have been closed to the public since lockdown began on 23rd March. Shopping online has proven to be a workable solution, but returns are a faff that many of us simply don’t have the time or inclination to deal with.

So news that non-essential shops can reopen from 15th June will come as welcome relief to many, and M&S is among the stores readying for that date. But a post-lockdown shopping trip will be markedly different from the experience we’ve come to know. 

Marks & Spencer

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Black-Owned Fashion Brands and Boutiques to Support Now and Forever

In the wake of recent events—most recently the murders of George FloydAhmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor—many people, including the Who What Wear editorial team, have been asking what they can do. Aurora James, the founder and designer of Brother Vellies, answered that question by creating the 15% Pledge, which calls major retailers to pledge 15% of their shelf space to Black-owned businesses. Swipe through her Instagram post below to read more about the reasoning and impact.

But what if you’re an individual? You can put pressure on these major retailers by contacting the company or commenting on their social posts. You can also consider dedicating 15% or more of your personal fashion spending to Black-owned brands.

It’s also important to note that the financial impact of COVID-19 has generally hit Black-owned brands harder than others, as illustrated in the graphic below by Mona Chalabi

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Why Fashion Is About to Get Very Understated

Click here to read the full article.

As the world begins opening up after months of isolating, there is no shortage of questions. What will day-to-day life be like after Covid-19 upended the status quo? There’s much that remains to be seen, but a recent report by Bank of America sheds light on at least one facet of post-pandemic life: what we’ll be wearing. While clothing and accessories may seem inconsequential given the enormous issues the world currently faces, it’s worth remembering that fashion and retail are a big businesses, employing tens of millions of people around the globe. The study is geared toward investors looking at the future of the industry. And, according to the findings, the future is all about understatement. Or, as the report’s title succinctly states, “Nobody wants to show off in a crisis”.

That may seem like a rather obvious observation, but the data offers

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